Latisse: The Answer for Longer and Richer Eyelashes

Are your lashes thinning over time? Then, it’s time for you to have some miracle on your eyelashes. You might have heard about Latisse, an eyelash grower, that has been in the market since the FDA approved it in December 2008. But how do you use it? Is it safe for your eyes? And does it really work for eyelash enhancement?

Latisse is actually a version of glaucoma drug; in its eye drop form called bimatoprost and by brand name as Lumigan, manufactured by Allergan, Inc. During the period of its approval, eye doctors and their glaucoma patients, after using generic latisse careprost, noticed a significant growth side-effect on the eyelashes. Their eyelashes got longer and thicker over time.

The eyelash enhancing effect of an active ingredient in bimatoprost solution called prostaglandin analog eventually led to the birth of latisse generic. Candidates participated in the studies experienced these results after 16 weeks-

  • Length of Eyelash increased by 25%.
  • Eyelash darkness increased by 18%.

Who Can Use Latisse?

To use Latisse, you must get a prescription from your doctor. They will check the health of your eyes to make sure they’re healthy enough for you to use this cosmetic drug. People suffering from certain eye conditions like conjunctivitis, macular edema, or uveitis should not use this generic latisse careprost.

Be aware that not every doctor will be familiar with Latisse. However, eye doctors, dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons are the specialists who are more likely to know about its availability.

How to Use Latisse?

  1. Clean your face. Remove makeup and contact lenses.
  2. Put a drop of Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) 0.03% on the disposable sterile applicator and apply evenly along the skin of the upper eyelid margin. Use once every night before bed.
  3. Blot any excess solution runoff from outside the upper lid with a tissue or other absorbent cloth.
  4. Dispose of the applicator after each use.
  5. Repeat the same for the other eyelid. Use a new applicator for another eyelid.
  6. The recommended dosage for increasing eyelashes is one drop of Latisse 0.03% applied with an applicator evenly along the skin of the upper eyelid

Eyelash-Growth

General Instructions

Do not use Latisse, if you are allergic to one of its ingredients.

  1. Do not apply to the lower lid. Only apply at the base of the upper lashes.
  2. If discontinued, lashes might gradually return to previous appearance.
  3. Additional application of Latisse will not increase your eyelashes.
  4. Should not be used by pregnant or nursing women.
  5. Wait for at least 15 minutes after application before you put back your contact lenses.

Latisse Side Effects

According to clinical studies conducted before FDA approval, latisse is safer for most people. During clinical studies, most candidates didn’t face any problem if latisse got into their eyes. But a few did experience some side effects including dry eyes and eyelid skin darkening. The side effects that occurred in the most percentage of candidates were redness and itchiness.

These side effects will go away when you stop using latisse. Another possible side effect of latisse is having your iris become darker with brown pigment, and this won’t go away when you stop using latisse.

If you experience a new ocular condition like trauma or infection, any ocular reactions, particularly conjunctivitis or eyelid reactions, or experience a sudden decrease in visual acuity, you should immediately seek your physician’s advice about the continued use of latisse solution.

Final Words…

Latisse is known to treat hypotrichosis of the eyelashes by increasing their growth, length, and thickness. The most active ingredient in latisse lowers the intraocular pressure. If you are already using IOP-reducing medications for ocular hypertension or glaucoma, you must consult your doctor before you start using Latisse, so that he/she can monitor your eye pressure closely. Visit here for tips to take care of eyelashes.

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